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lazazie
Traveller
2 comments

Posted 3 weeks ago

Hello.
I am trying to organize the purchase of an interrail pass to travel in Scandinavia from Berlin this summer. I see there are interrail passes for 5 train journeys/days. But what does it mean? If I take this pass and I use it one day from Copenhagen for a half hour journey it's the same as if I travel another day from Berlin to Copenhagen? I can't make up my mind about what pass I should buy. I don't know for how many days/rides I'd need it. I wanted to break the distance and stop one night in Hamburg between Berlin and Copenhagen. However, if we stop, or ride for short distance, buying a pass for 7 rides or days l, or more, doesn't seem to be worth it.

Can anybody help me and suggest which pass we can need for travelling from Berlin to Bergen (Norway) through Denmark? We are also taking some ferries.

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Arend7
Traveller
546 comments

replied 3 weeks ago

Start looking at www.bahn.de. An electronic timetable where you exactly can see how much a train trip needs in total Europe. You can also us www.dsb.dk for Denmark www.sj.se for Sweden en www.vy.no for Norway. One ride on one day is indeed a whole travel day. Pay it with a normal ticket. Berlin to Bergen will be 2 days, if not using night trains (see timetables)

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lazazie
Traveller
2 comments

replied 3 weeks ago

So, you mean that I shouldn't buy any interrail pass but directly pay each ticket? We have 3 children that wouldn't pay any ticket and travel free on an interrail pass. The problem is that I can't make up my mind on which shall I buy

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Arend7
Traveller
546 comments

replied 3 weeks ago

No, you should buy an Interrail pass, but only on a day with only one trip pay with a normal ticket.

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nltrainer
Traveller
1310 comments

replied 3 weeks ago

NB! ANY INterrail GLOBal pass is ONLY valid for max 2 days in your home-country-so a break in HH will mean you cannot use it on the way back to B.
On the site of eu/interrail is an overview of which ferries give discounts-sometimes big, sometimes small- to use that you do not need to use ┬┤passdays┬┤.
If you are in a city and only make a short daytrip-noone forces you to use that pass-can also buy other ticket-and f.e. in Scandinavia its now often possible to simply check in/out with bank or creditcard- the total fare to be paid will then be taken from account in the night after. For many Germans this is shell-shock in modernity, others only say: why do not we have that?
Last summer I used a 7-day pass for Denmark (is only in summer and not very expensive) to travel around there-is also valid on bus/tram etc.
DB will also like to sell you the passes for the adult parents and claim thatb they can give advice and make some bookings-just position yourself in line and wait your turn.

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lazazie
Traveller
2 comments

replied 3 weeks ago

Ok. No problem. We are Italian. So we don't have the limit of 2 rides in Germany.
Basically you all suggest we should use the pass only on long rides and get "pass discounts" for shorter trips.
Then I could maybe get the 7-day pass for short distance trains, and besides the interrail global pass

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MisterSteve
Traveller
813 comments

replied 3 weeks ago

First of all wher eon teh Interral website does it suggest 5 train jouneys, I can only see it clearly saying 5 (or other number) DAYS - if you donlt pay attentin to detail you will end in being stranded somewhere.

Second, your question said staring in Berlin. If you live in Berlin then Germany is your home country even if you are Italian.